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School stand-ins make grade

Principal for a Day event in its 18th year
By: Megan Wood The Press-Tribune
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Despite a college degree and career with Hewlett-Packard, Tom Barrington found himself back in middle school last week as principal of Warren T. Eich Intermediate School. Arranged by the Chamber of Commerce committee called Business Educators and Community Organized to Maximize Education, this year was the 18th year for the Principal for a Day event. “This is my second year participating in this program. It’s really a lot of fun and it gave me an appreciation for the students in our community as well as the quality of the education system,” said Barrington, vice president of education for the Chamber of Commerce and global energy program manager for Hewlett-Packard. Barrington was paired with Chris Hudson, principal of Eich for the past three years, whose personal philosophy is centered around the idea that in order for a principal to do their job well, they must know what is going on in the classrooms and on school grounds. Her philosophy was demonstrated throughout the day as she greeted and interacted with students passing in the halls and in the classrooms. Barrington’s day as principal began with Hudson and Vice Principal Brandon Beadle in the school quad greeting and interacting with the students before their first class. Gaggles of girls stood in circles chatting and giggling while the boys wove in and out of the girls’ circles collecting hugs and shoves along the way. “This is life for them. Socializing is the No. 1 priority. When we’re out here, we’re accessible and we bond with them,” Beadle said. “It’s a trust-building environment.” Barrington said one of the highlights of his day was touring several of the classrooms and seeing the students and teachers in action. “This is very refreshing after work, work, work all the time and conference calls,” Barrington said. Barrington spent time in Jim Gonsalves’ band class where students showed off their new music lab equipped with a program called Garage Band that allows students to record themselves practicing and composing music of their own. Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”Aaron Carroll, an eighth-grader, has already recorded several of his own compositions in the lab. Using only the computer and a keyboard Carroll can assign instruments to individual tracks that, when played simultaneously, create complete musical scores. “I really liked watching the kids working in the music lab. You could see real talent and they were giving them the tools to grow that talent,” Barrington said. “It was great to see these flashes of brilliance with these kids. “Next stop was Gil Gorospe’s history class where he was leading his students into a spirited debate about states’ rights versus the federal government. “What’s amazing is that someone can go to work each day with that kind of energy. I wanted to hear his entire lecture,” Barrington said. “Today reminded me of the passion that can be found in a workplace. It’s so easy to lose that and get ground down.” “This is a very important event that is about building relationships between businesses and schools that are essential to the vitality of the community,” said Collin Fat, president of the Roseville Chamber of Commerce. “It’s truly an eye-opening experience.”